Episode 3 – available on June 26th

Best selling authors Cornelia Funke and Patrick Rothfuss
discuss fantastic fantasy fiction with Les Klinger.

Cornelia Funke

Patrick Rothfuss

Leslie S. Klinger


Produced in partnership with the Altadena Library District

Cornelia Funke

For years Cornelia Funke has been one of the best-known and bestselling children’s authors in Germany. In fact, many people have called her the German J. K. Rowling. Americans, however, were not exposed to Funke’s work until 2002, when her book Herr der Diebe was translated into English and released by Scholastic Press as The Thief Lord. The book made every major bestseller list and won countless awards. It also established Funke as a storyteller on an international scale, since the book has since been published in nearly forty countries. In 2003 Funke released her second book, Inkheart. Publisher’s Weekly called it “delectably transfixing,” and readers were left clamoring for more of their favorite new author. She always does her own sketches in pen and ink – she creates a picture of her own characters to help her write about them. Cornelia Funke describes herself as a passionate reader and one of her goals as an author is to “try to awaken the passion for reading in children and adults.”

Pan’s Labyrinth

Cornelia Funke and Oscar winning writer-director Guillermo del Toro have come together to transform del Toro’s hit movie Pan’s Labyrinth into an epic and dark fantasy novel for readers of all ages, complete with haunting illustrations and enchanting short stories that flesh out the folklore of this fascinating world. This spellbinding tale takes readers to a sinister, magical, and war-torn world filled with richly drawn characters like trickster fauns, murderous soldiers, child-eating monsters, courageous rebels, and a long-lost princess hoping to be reunited with her family.

Patrick Rothfuss

Patrick Rothfuss is an American writer of epic fantasy. He is best known for his ongoing trilogy The Kingkiller Chronicle, which won him several awards, including the 2007 Quill Award for his debut novel, The Name of the Wind. Its sequel, The Wise Man’s Fear, topped The New York Times Best Seller list. He was born in Madison, Wisconsin to awesome parents who encouraged him to read and create through reading to him, gentle boosts of self-esteem, and deprivation of cable television. During his formative years, he read extensively and wrote terrible short stories and poetry to teach himself what not to do. He started and organizes a charity fundraiser called Worldbuilders which, since 2008, has raised over $10 million, primarily for Heifer International, a charity that provides livestock, clean water, education, and training for communities in the developing world. Life continues to rock for him, and he’s working hard on writing the final installment of the series.

The Name of the Wind

My name is Kvothe. I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. So begins a tale unequaled in fantasy literature—the story of a hero told in his own voice. It is a tale of sorrow, a tale of survival, a tale of one man’s search for meaning in his universe, and how that search, and the indomitable will that drove it, gave birth to a legend.

Leslie S. Klinger

Leslie S. Klinger is considered to be one of the world’s foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, Dracula, H. P. Lovecraft, Frankenstein, and the history of mystery and horror fiction. His work has received numerous awards and nominations, including the Edgar for Best Critical-Biographical Book in 2005 for The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories and in 2019 for Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s. He is currently nominated for an Anthony for Best Critical/Non-fiction for Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s. Klinger also lectures extensively on Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Dracula, Bram Stoker, H. P. Lovecraft, and the Victorian age. He has taught a number of courses on these topics for UCLA Extension. Klinger has traveled extensively as a public speaker on these topics, including programs in Istanbul, Transylvania, Toronto, and the House of Lords in London, as well as college campuses around the U.S.

American Gods

Destined to be a treasure for the millions of fans who made American Gods an internationally bestselling phenomenon, this beautifully designed and illustrated collectible edition of Neil Gaiman’s revered masterpiece features enlightening and incisive notes throughout by award-winning annotator and editor Leslie S. Klinger. A perennial favorite of readers worldwide, American Gods tells the story of ex-con Shadow Moon, who emerges from prison and is recruited to be bodyguard, driver, and errand boy for the enigmatic Mr. Wednesday. So begins a dark and strange road trip full of fantastical adventures and a host of eccentric characters. For, beneath the placid surface of everyday life, a storm is brewing—an epic war for the very soul of America—and Shadow is standing squarely in its path. This annotated volume of the Author’s Preferred Text features analysis from Leslie S. Klinger. His trenchant commentary identifies gods and supernatural beings, elucidates key phrases, and shows how Gaiman built his award-winning novel, giving readers unparalleled insight into the story and into Gaiman’s creative process and authorial decisions. Carefully chosen illustrations complement and illuminate the narrative.

Episode 2 – available on June 12th

Naomi Hirahara and Gary Phillips join Les Klinger to discuss their writing processes, diverse mystery books, the world of modern publishing, and much more.

naomi hirahara

Naomi Hirahara

Gary Phillips

Gary Phillips

Klinger

Leslie S. Klinger


Produced in partnership with the Altadena Library District

Naomi Hirahara

Naomi Hirahara is the Edgar Award-winning author of two mystery series set in Southern California. Her Mas Arai series, which features a Hiroshima survivor and Altadena gardener, ended with the publication of Hiroshima Boy in 2018. The books have been translated into Japanese, Korean and French. The first in her Officer Ellie Rush bicycle cop mystery series received the T. Jefferson Parker Mystery Award. Her new mystery set in Hawai’i, Iced in Paradise, was released in September 2019. She is currently working on Clark and Division, a historical mystery set in 1944 Chicago which will be published by Soho Crime in 2021. A former editor of The Rafu Shimpo newspaper, she has also published noir short stories, middle-grade fiction and nonfiction history books. She born in Pasadena and currently lives there today.

Hiroshima Boy

L.A. gardener Mas Arai returns to Hiroshima to bring his best friend’s ashes to a relative on the tiny offshore island of Ino, only to become embroiled in the mysterious death of a teenage boy who was about the same age Mas was when he survived the atomic bomb in 1945. The boy’s death affects the elderly, often-curmudgeonly, always-reluctant sleuth, who cannot return home to Los Angeles until he finds a way to see justice served.

Gary Phillips

Gary Phillips drew on his years as a community organizer to write Violent Spring, the first mystery novel set in the aftermath of the ’92 Rodney King riots. Since then he has written various other novels, novellas, short stories, comics, edited anthologies such as the Anthony award-winning the Obama Inheritance: Fifteen Stories of Conspiracy Noir, and was a staff writer on Snowfall, an FX show about crack and the CIA in 1980s South Central where he grew up. Currently he has a short story in Three Room Press’ anthology The Faking of the President: Nineteen Stories of White House Noir, “Y2 Effin’ K.” Scheduled to drop on July 7 is a novel wherein real life North Pole explorer Matthew Henson is re-imagined in the Indiana Jones/Doc Savage mold set in the Roaring ‘20s, Matthew Henson and the Ice Temple of Harlem.

The Be-Bop Barbarians

In the turbulent era of late 1950s Manhattan—with jazz, the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement, and the Red Scare as the volatile ingredients—three groundbreaking black cartoonists defy convention and pay the price. Cliff Murphy is matinee handsome, a light-skinned, straight-haired black man and a comics artist known for his glamour girl art. He’s black uptown and white downtown, and he has an eye for the ladies, and they for him—including his boss’ wife, who knows Cliff’s creation, the Phantom Avenger, is about to be stolen from him.

Leslie S. Klinger

Leslie S. Klinger is considered to be one of the world’s foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, Dracula, H. P. Lovecraft, Frankenstein, and the history of mystery and horror fiction. His work has received numerous awards and nominations, including the Edgar for Best Critical-Biographical Book in 2005 for The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories and in 2019 for Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s. He is currently nominated for an Anthony for Best Critical/Non-fiction for Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s. He was the technical advisor for Warner Bros. on Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011). His introductions and essays have appeared in numerous books, graphic novels, academic journals newspapers, and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s

Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s includes House Without a KeyThe Benson Murder CaseThe Roman Hat MysteryRed Harvest, and Little Caesar. Each of the five novels included is presented in its original published form, with extensive historical and cultural annotations and illustrations added by Edgar-winning editor Leslie S. Klinger, allowing the reader to experience the story to its fullest. This gorgeously illustrated volume includes over 100 color and black and white images as well as an introduction by the eminent mystery publisher Otto Penzler.

Episode 1

Watch Les Klinger as he joins Laurie R. King and David Morrell historical fiction writers

Les-Klinger

Les Klinger

Laurie-R-King

Laurie R. King

David-Morrell

David Morrell


Produced in partnership with the Altadena Library District

Leslie S. Klinger

Leslie S. Klinger is considered to be one of the world’s foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, Dracula, H. P. Lovecraft, Frankenstein, and the history of mystery and horror fiction. Klinger is a long-time member of the Baker Street Irregulars, and served as the Series Editor for the Manuscript Series of The Baker Street Irregulars; he is currently the Series Editor for the BSI’s Biography Series. He served three terms as Chapter President of the SoCal Chapter of the Mystery Writers of America and on its National Board.

For the Sake of the Game is the latest volume in the award-winning series from New York Times bestselling editors Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger, with stories of Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson, and friends in a variety of eras and forms. King and Klinger have a simple formula: ask some of the world’s greatest writers―regardless of genre―to be inspired by the stories of Arthur Conan Doyle.

Laurie R. King

Laurie R. King is the New York Times bestselling author of 27 novels and other works, including the Mary Russell-Sherlock Holmes stories (from The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, named one of the 20th century’s best crime novels by the IMBA, to 2018’s Island of the Mad). She has won an alphabet of prizes from Agatha to Wolfe, been chosen as guest of honor at several crime conventions, and is probably the only writer to have both an Edgar and an honorary doctorate in theology. She was inducted into the Baker Street Irregulars in 2010, as “The Red Circle.”

In Laurie’s upcoming book, Rivera Gold, Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes find themselves immersed in the social scene of American expatriates, who spend their days on the beach in the Rivera and their evenings in villas filled with music and enthralling conversation. Despite the luxury and leisure, a new mystery arises. Release date is June 9, 2020.

David Morrell

David Morrell is the award-winning author of First Blood, the novel in which Rambo was created. Always interested in different ways to tell a story, he wrote the six-part comic-book series, Captain America: The Chosen, the two-part comic-book series, Spider-Man: Frost, and the standalone comic book, Savage Wolverine:Feral. Morrell’s latest novels, Murder as a Fine Art, Inspector of the Dead, and Ruler of the Night are Victorian mystery/thrillers that explore the fascinating world of 1850s London. He is an Edgar, Anthony, Thriller, and Arthur Ellis finalist, a Nero and Macavity winner, and a three-time recipient of the distinguished Bram Stoker Award from the Horror Writers Association.

Murder As a Fine Art is the first in a three-book Victorian mystery/thriller series. Each novel has a backdrop of a real 1800s crime that paralyzed England: the Radcliffe Highway mass murders, the numerous attempts to assassinate Queen Victoria, and the first murder on an English train (on 1800s English trains, no one could hear you scream).

What is Open Book On Location?

If you want to be notified of the next release, Please give us your email:


Thank you to all 2019 season Open Book sponsors:


In partnership with:

What is the Open Book Series?

Building on the successful Pasadena Festival of Woman Authors event which has been presented annually since 2009, the vision for the new series is to provide opportunities for the community to enjoy authors of all kinds – both established and emerging, national and local, men and women, writers of fiction and non-fiction – in settings that complement the author’s work or background and allow for engagement with the attendees.